fcrackzip – Password Cracker for Zip Archives

fcrackzip is a fast password cracker partly written in assembler. It is able to crack password protected zip files with brute force or dictionary based attacks, optionally testing with unzip its results.

It can also crack cpmask’ed images.Ubuntu

Install fcrackzip in ubuntu

sudo apt-get install fcrackzip

This will complete the installation

fcrackzip Syntax

fcrackzip [-bDBchVvplum2] [–brute-force] [–dictionary] [–benchmark] [–charset characterset] [–help] [–validate] [–verbose] [–init-password string/path] [–length min-max] [–use-unzip] [–method name] [–modulo r/m] file…

fcrackzip Examples

fcrackzip -c a -p aaaaaa sample.zip

checks the encrypted files in sample.zip for all lowercase 6 character passwords (aaaaaa … abaaba … ghfgrg … zzzzzz).

fcrackzip –method cpmask –charset A –init AAAA test.ppm

checks the obscured image test.ppm for all four character passwords. -TP fcrackzip -D -p passwords.txt sample.zip check for every password listed in the file passwords.txt.

Engineers for Social Impact: A unique fellowship program

Program: Engineers For Social Impact (Website)
E4SI
Engineers for Social Impact is a unique fellowship program to connect the best engineering talent to the most credible social enterprises that drive market-based solutions to development in India.

In 2008, an eminent panel of judges will select 5 E4SI Fellows to gain from challenging immersion experiences in partner social enterprises. In addition, they will join a select cohort of outstanding young leaders committed to social impact and build valuable relationships with leaders in the development sector.E4SI partner social enterprises (founded by alumni from schools such as Harvard, Wharton, INSEAD and IIT) are leaders in the sectors of Education, Energy, Health, Micro-finance and Multiple Bottom-line Investment Advisory.

The application is open to current undergraduate students at select Indian engineering schools.

Application Deadline: March 2, 2008

Website: E4SI

Java Technology: Part-1

Java Technology:

Java technology is both a high-level, object-oriented programming language and a platform. Java technology is based on the concept of a single Java Virtual Machine (JVM) — a translator between the language and the underlying software and hardware. All implementations of the programming language must emulate the JVM, enabling Java programs to run on any system that has a version of the JVM.

The Java programming language is unusual because Java programs are both compiled (translated into an intermediate language called Java bytecode) and interpreted (bytecode parsed and run by the JVM). Compilation occurs once, and interpretation happens each time the program runs. Compiled bytecode is a form of optimized machine code for the JVM; the interpreter is an implementation of the JVM.

The Java platform is a software-only platform that runs on top of various hardware-based platforms. It comes in three versions (see Multiple editions of the Java platform, below). It consists of the JVM and the Java Application Programming Interface (API), a large collection of ready-made software components (classes) that ease the development and deployment of applets and applications, including robust, secure, and interoperable enterprise applications. It spans everything from basic objects to networking and security and XML generation and Web services. The Java API is grouped into libraries of related classes and interfaces; the libraries are known as packages.

Along with the Java API, every full implementation of the Java platform includes:

  • Development tools for compiling, running, monitoring, debugging, and documenting applications.
  • Standard mechanisms for deploying applications to users.
  • User interface toolkits that make it possible to create sophisticated graphical user interfaces
  • Integration libraries that enable database access and manipulation of remote objects.

Java technology was developed by Sun Microsystems. The Java Community Process (JCP), an open organization of international Java developers and licensees, develops and revises Java technology specifications, reference implementations, and technology compatibility kits. In 2007, Sun made the bulk of its core Java technology available as open-source software under the GNU general public license version 2 (GPLv2).

Source : IBM DeveloperWorks

Tomboy-Panel for quick access of notes

TomboyTomboy

The Ubuntu desktop comes preloaded with a fantastic note-taking application called Tomboy.

While the application can be easily accessed from the desktop Applications menu (under the Accessories sub-menu), it can me cumbersome to have to remember to launch this application each time a desktop session is started.

Fortunately, the tomboy application can be added to the desktop panel in a convenient form. Just right click on an empty area of the panel, and choose Add To Panel. In the resulting window, under the Accessories section, find and double click the Tomboy Notes. Now you should have a little notepad icon in your desktop panel. Click on this icon to access all your notes instantly, or to create new notes.

Using this method will also ensure that the Tomboy application gets added to your panel on every startup, ensuring that you’ll always have quick access to your notes.

addrepo – Easiest way to add APT repositories

addrepo is a simple command line interface for easily adding APT repositories to your sources.list

Install addrepo in Ubuntu

This is very simple process just use the following two commands

sudo wget http://mac4deb.googlepages.com/addrepo -O /usr/bin/addrepo

sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/addrepo

Using addrepo

addrepo [repository]

Now you just replace ‘[repository]’ with a repository name

addrepo example

addrepo deb http://dl.google.com/linux/deb/ stable non-free

It already includes ’sudo,’ so adding sudo before you enter the command is not necessary.

Commands Recap

sudo wget http://mac4deb.googlepages.com/addrepo -O /usr/bin/addrepo

sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/addrepo

Lanmap – Network discovery tool

Lanmap Listens to all available traffic on the interface of your choice, figures out who’s talking to who, how much, using which protocols.This information is then put into a nice human-readable 2d image (various formats are available) which can be used to understand a network’s topology.

Install lanmap in Ubuntu

sudo aptitude install lanmap

This will complete the installation

Using lanmap

lanmap syntax

lanmap [-o directory] [-e program] [-T {png,gif,svg}] [-f filtetr] [-D {#,all,raw}] [-r seconds]

[-i {?,*wildcard*,iface}] [-h] [-v] [-V]

lanmap example

lanmap -i eth0 -r 30 -T png -o /tmp/

This will create a lanmap.png file under tmp folder

lanmap available options

-o directory – The directory in which to save the generated images. Default is the current directory.

-e program – The program to use to generate images. Default is twopi.

-T {png,gif,svg} – Output image format. Default is png.

-f filter – Traffic filter, in libpcap syntax.

-D {#,all,raw} – Debug mode; lots of output, use with caution. #: payload bytes to dump (default: 0)

-r seconds – Set the time interval between 2 consecutive graph generations. Default is 60 seconds.

-i {?,*wildcard*,iface} – Interface to use: ?: list all devices and exit *3Com*: use the first NIC with

“3Com” in it

-V – Version info.

-vv – Verbose mode, up to 3 levels (-vv, -vv09:21 29/11/2007v).

-h – Help message.